♥ Old Hollywood ♥

April. 29. Indiana.
this blog is mainly Old Hollywood. also... History. Film. Hannibal. American Horror Story. and my obsession with Michael Pitt! <3

Mary Pickford photographed at the Hartsook studio, 1918

(via jeannecrains)

misstanwyck:

HAPPY BIRTHDAY Barbara Stanwyck
July 16, 1907 - January 20, 1990 

In the early days, Mary Pickford was known as ‘America’s Sweetheart’ - and by the same token, Barbara Stanwyck was and still is The Sweetheart of the Motion Picture Industry.
- Ray Rennahan (Cinematographer)
If anyone ever needed a term for courtesy and consideration, generosity and, above all, professionalism, they would only need two words. One: Barbara and the other: Stanwyck
- William Holden
She’s absolutely loyal. If she feels something is right, no one can change her mind, she’ll stand up against director, producer, and writer, come hell or high pressure.
- Edith Head

ourmarilynmonroe:

Marilyn Monroe in a Fox publicity still, 1947.

(via lottiepickford)

Joan Crawford in The Unknown (1927)

Joan Crawford in The Unknown (1927)

Above: Monty Westmore applies a week’s growth of beard on Leslie Howard for Ashley’s return from a Northern prison. The stubble was applied right over makeup.

Below: A weary Ashley Wilkes returns to Tara after the war, sporting a hand applied beard.


A pipe-smoking Leslie Howard in change #3, the Confederate major’s butternut uniform, hat, overcoat and boots with spurs that Ashley wears to come home for Christmas (price $150). Sitting behind him are some of the many women extras that were dressed in black, mourning for the loved ones that had already been killed in the war. 
"Yesterday I put on my Confederate uniform for the first time," Howard said in January 1939, "and looked like a fairy doorman at the Beverly Wilshire— a fine thing at my age." Wilbur Kurtz helped with the wardrobe details— how to draw the sword and pin the Confederate medals. His input was indispensable, even with minor characters: "In nearly every instance where the coachman or carriage driver appeared, he was clad in what might have been the cast-off frippery of his master and he always knew when or where not to wear his tall hat— and he never left the carriage box without taking his whip along." 

A pipe-smoking Leslie Howard in change #3, the Confederate major’s butternut uniform, hat, overcoat and boots with spurs that Ashley wears to come home for Christmas (price $150). Sitting behind him are some of the many women extras that were dressed in black, mourning for the loved ones that had already been killed in the war. 

"Yesterday I put on my Confederate uniform for the first time," Howard said in January 1939, "and looked like a fairy doorman at the Beverly Wilshire— a fine thing at my age." Wilbur Kurtz helped with the wardrobe details— how to draw the sword and pin the Confederate medals. His input was indispensable, even with minor characters: "In nearly every instance where the coachman or carriage driver appeared, he was clad in what might have been the cast-off frippery of his master and he always knew when or where not to wear his tall hat— and he never left the carriage box without taking his whip along." 

gregorypecks:

Katharine Hepburn on stage at the Colonial Theater during the Boston run of “The Philadelphia Story,” March 1939

Kevin Spacey: Now, it got to the point where I actually started to talk to the audience. I actually started saying “Put that phone down!” And my fellow cast members decided that they weren’t quite comfortable with me breaking the fourth wall in that way… so anyway, here’s what happened. A couple of my friends in the cast decided that they wanted to try to help me be able to solve the problem [audience members distracting him while he is performing on stage. Spacey was performing “Richard III” in cities around the world] without actually talking to the audience or flipping them off.David Letterman: Richard III! Giving someone the finger! Kevin Spacey: Yeah, he flipped them off in Spain.David Letterman: You can’t do that!Kevin Spacey: Oh yeah you can. I saw Katharine Hepburn do it once… There was a guy in the theatre who put his feet up on the stage… he was in the first row… and she was in the middle of a scene… going “You don’t understand, the thing you have to do - GET YOUR FEET OFF THERE YOU PIG, THIS IS THE THEATRE!”

gregorypecks:

Katharine Hepburn on stage at the Colonial Theater during the Boston run of “The Philadelphia Story,” March 1939

Kevin Spacey: Now, it got to the point where I actually started to talk to the audience. I actually started saying “Put that phone down!” And my fellow cast members decided that they weren’t quite comfortable with me breaking the fourth wall in that way… so anyway, here’s what happened. A couple of my friends in the cast decided that they wanted to try to help me be able to solve the problem [audience members distracting him while he is performing on stage. Spacey was performing “Richard III” in cities around the world] without actually talking to the audience or flipping them off.
David Letterman: Richard III! Giving someone the finger!
Kevin Spacey: Yeah, he flipped them off in Spain.
David Letterman: You can’t do that!
Kevin Spacey: Oh yeah you can. I saw Katharine Hepburn do it once… There was a guy in the theatre who put his feet up on the stage… he was in the first row… and she was in the middle of a scene… going “You don’t understand, the thing you have to do - GET YOUR FEET OFF THERE YOU PIG, THIS IS THE THEATRE!”

(via aint-that-a-kick)

fuckindiva:

Vivien Leigh

(via judysgarland)

lesliehowardforever:

Of Human Bondage


Clark Gable in Gone with the Wind, 1939.

Clark Gable in Gone with the Wind, 1939.

hollywoodlady:

Tony Curtis and Janet Leigh for The Black Shield of Falworth, 1954

hollywoodlady:

Tony Curtis and Janet Leigh for The Black Shield of Falworth, 1954